Reviews

Comic Review – Limbo #6

  • Writer: Dan Watters
  • Artist: Caspar Wijngaard
  • Letterer: Jim Campbell
  • Publisher: Image Comics
  • Release Date: April 13, 2016

This advance review was made possible by series creators Dan Watters and Caspar Wijngaard who helpfully provided me with a review copy. Honest thoughts and major spoilers follow.

I can’t believe that we’re finally here on Limbo #6.

It’s been a fantastic six months of neon, gorgeous art, and a storyline that made me recommend the series to basically everyone I came across both on and offline. And now the miniseries’ wild ride is over. Wow. Honestly, I had to let that reality sink in a bit because Limbo is hands down my favorite comic miniseries.

Last month in Limbo #5, things came to a head in a major way.

Limbo #6 cover

Through Sandy’s explortions into the land of the loa, we find out that the events of the series, possibly Dedande City itself, all spiral out from a wager between two bored loa. Clay has been given a second chance at (un)life for the sake of this game, with Maman Bridgette thinking that he’ll change his ways and her husband eager to prove otherwise. The tension builds and builds until at the end of the issue, we see that while Sandy has returned to Dedande City, she hasn’t come back alone. Baron Saturday is riding her, sitting just underneath her skin and controlling her every move as he strives to make Clay kill and commit “evil”.

This month in Limbo #6, we see what comes next. And boy, a lot of stuff comes next.

In this issue, we return to the idea of the male film noir detective that’s always chasing his next case. No matter what he does, he always returns to the cycle of hunting his next clue or the mysterious figure stalking them and then being hunted by someone determined to stop him. Detectives like the ones Dashiell Hammett created back in the heydays of pulp fiction never stopped chasing, never stopped looking for their next case.  I love that Limbo #6 has Baron Saturday point out a sort of futility to their actions because well… on one hand I agree, but on the other –

We know that the baron is biased so maybe we’re only supposed to agree with him up to a point.

I’ve been reading and rereading this issue on end, trying to make sure that I catch everything. It’s amazing. For much of the series, while I’ve liked Clay, he’s never been one of my main focuses. This is of course, despite him being the main character. Hey, I have my weaknesses and in this comic those weaknesses helpfully take the shape of Maman Bridgette and Sandy.

However, in Limbo #6, Clay really goes above and beyond. He makes his way back to Dedande City proper and proceeds to wreck the Thumb’s everything in his quest to find and save Sandy. Burning his club, fighting his men, being a general action hero badass of epic proportions.

What I actually love about what we get from Clay this issue, is that a huge chunk of his onscreen violence is overlaid with someone else’s narration. We have Baron Saturday’s detective thoughts at the start. Then, when the Thumb confronts Bridgette, he has this stunningly intense monologue about violence. It’s amazing and you have to read it to get the full effect.

I don’t agree with the Thumb’s apparent moralizing, but his views on violence are so interesting especially when put up against Clay actually enacting violence against other people.

Of course, when Clay actually comes up against him, the Thumb easily flings him away. It’s amazing because he does the actual spin-and-fling move that sends Clay crashing up against a wall of television monitors.

And Clay still tries to get up. He still continues fighting. Really, more so than any of the other characters in the series, Clay has grown on me because of his determination. There were other characters I never got into and some that I decided I liked upon their first appearances, but no one grew on me like Clay did. I mean, who else would go up against loa and an overpowered masked wrestler just to get their one friend back? Clay is amazing and the determination that he has as a character is wonderful to read.

Now, I’m really not going to spoil the ending of the comic for you, but trust me: nothing is as it seems and by the time you reach the end of the issue, you’ll probably join me in making high pitched noises. While it’s not technically a cliffhanger (as it is an actual ending), the final few pages of Limbo #6 definitely leaves you hanging on some aspects while answering other questions. I got actual chills on the last like two pages and I think that reaction is par for the course.

If you read Limbo #6 come Wednesday and don’t wind up with goosebumps or an urge to put your copy down and wail at the sky in a form of hilarious overreaction, I’m going to judge you.

Limbo #6 is a lot of things.

Satisfying.

Confusing.

Stressful.

It’s also incredible. Every issue, I’ve given this comic perfect marks. It’s my favorite comic miniseries and I shout it from the rooftops at every chance I get because it’s such a nuanced comic with a ton of different things going on at every single moment. The combination of Dan Watters’ clever writing and Caspar Wijngaard’s gorgeous art and colors really served to make Limbo a series that stands out. I don’t think that any other creative team could’ve done a book like this and I just hope that we get to the two of them working together on other books in the future (perhaps something else set in the Limbo universe), because wow, what a team. What a book!


To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook.

Check out other comic book news, previews and reviews here!

Follow Word of the Nerd on

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterestInstagramYouTubeTwitch

Bringing out the inner nerd in everyone!

About the author

Zina Hutton

writes about comics, nerd history, and ridiculous romance novels when not working frantically on her first collection of short stories.

Advertisement

Check out our YouTube Channel

%d bloggers like this: