Books

Hugo Eligible Novels We Missed This Year

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What Did We Miss?

 

What Does Hugo Eligible Mean?

The Hugo Awards are given out each year at WorldCon, this year it was held in Dublin. People who purchase memberships before the year ends can nominate and vote on which SFF works are deserving of that year’s Hugo. There are rules for novels specifically. First, they have to be published in the year of eligibility. In this case, that means that books that were published this year (2019) are eligible. Secondly, novels are works that are over 40,000 words. If either of those conditions is not met, work is not a Hugo eligible novel. If it is shorter than 40,000 words, it could be a Hugo eligible shorter work.

Here is the link to where you can purchase your very own membership. Even if you miss the 31 December nominating purchase deadline date, you can still vote on the nominated works. You even get a packet with a lot of the eligible works bundled inside! It’s a lot of fun to participate. 

Hugo Eligible Novels WotN Missed

WotN reviewed a lot of books this year (you can look at the reviews here and here). However, some books are Hugo eligible that we didn’t get to do a full review of. Here are 10 mini-reviews of books you can still nominate if you pick them up.

 

The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon
Samantha Shannon – The Priory of the Orange Tree

The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon

Release Date: 26 February 2019

Review: Ead Duryan is supposed to protect the Queen of Inys from outside threats until Queen Sabran conceives an heir. However, threats are coming from all sides, including from inside the palace. A well-written and well-plotted epic fantasy. This is the longest book I read this year and it was so worth it.

 

The Bird King by G. Willow Wilson
The Bird King by G. Willow Wilson

The Bird King by G. Willow Wilson

Release Date: 12 March 2019
Review: When the palace where they live is taken over by a Christian force, Fatima and Hassan must flee. Their world has ended; they must find a new one. A slow and mostly quiet fantasy that centers a platonic relationship facing their world-changing and facing forces wanting them to change.

The True Queen (Sorcerer Royal #2) by Zen Cho
The True Queen (Sorcerer Royal #2) by Zen Cho

The True Queen by Zen Cho

Release Date: 12 March 2019
Review: A fun follow-up to Sorcerer to the Crown. A curse hits Muna and her sister at the beginning of the book. Sakti can perform magic while Muna cannot. They attempt to journey to England from Janda Baik to break their curse, but only Muna makes it. She must pretend to be capable of magic as she figures out what happened to Sakti and what happened to the pair of them.

The Perfect Assassin (The Chronicles of Ghadid #1) by K.A. Doore
The Perfect Assassin (The Chronicles of Ghadid #1) by K.A. Doore

The Perfect Assassin by K.A. Doore

Release Date: 19 March 2019
Review: After Amastan and his cohorts complete their assassin training, they find out that no contracts are being given out. However, someone who lacks institutional knowledge is killing people. Really good economic/justice worldbuilding, and an interesting and well-seeded mystery.

The Light Brigade by Kameron Hurley
The Light Brigade by Kameron Hurley

The Light Brigade by Kameron Hurley

Release Date: 26 March 2019
Review: In the future, armies can turn into light and travel to fight on different planets. However, recruit Dietz keeps popping back and forth in time. Through this technological mishap, Dietz discovers that not all is as it seems. The book is well-structured, keeping track of where the protagonist is and where the supporting characters are. This can be difficult in a time-travel novel. Worth it, even if military science fiction is not your usual thing.

A Memory Called Empire (Teixcalaan #1) by Arkady Martine
A Memory Called Empire (Teixcalaan #1) by Arkady Martine

A Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine

Release Date: 26 March 2019
Review: Ambassador Mahit Dzmare arrives in the interstellar Teixcalaani Empire to discover that her predecessor has been murdered. Now, she must figure out where the danger in court is while trying to settle her political position. It’s a court politics murder mystery in space! This book touched upon various consequences of imperialism, differing societal perspectives, fatalities in court politics, linguistics of a foreign language, and the legacy of memory. I really enjoyed it.

The Luminous Dead by Caitlin Starling
The Luminous Dead by Caitlin Starling

The Luminous Dead by Caitlin Starling

Release Date: 2 April 2019
Review: In this claustrophobic novel, Em contracts Gyre to go into a mysterious cave with a suit that Em can control if she chooses. Gyre has essentially lied on her resume (giving Em leverage if needed), and Em isn’t truly truthful either. However, they have to trust each other if they want to meet their own goals. Combines psychological drama with the sheer terror of exploring a dangerous cave, while only featuring two characters.

The Outside by Ada Hoffmann
The Outside by Ada Hoffmann

The Outside by Ada Hoffman

Release Date: 11 June 2019
Review: After an experiment goes terribly wrong, Yasira is abducted by AI angels. They want her to track down her erstwhile mentor, who helped inspire the experiment. Fairly weird, but in a good way.

 

The Affair of the Mysterious Letter by Alexis Hall
The Affair of the Mysterious Letter by Alexis Hall

The Affair of the Mysterious Letter by Alexis Hall

Release Date: 18 June 2019
Review: In a future fantasy take on Sherlock Holmes, our narrator is Captain John Wyndham, who has just gotten a new roommate: Ms. Shaharazad Haas. He gets wrapped up in her magical mystery antics. Haas is very devil-may-care, like many Holmes before her. Wyndham has a strong grip on the narration, often reminding the reader that he is looking back on escapades that have happened a long time ago. Utterly fun and bizarre.

 

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia
Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Release Date: 23 July 2019
Review:  A beautifully written novel about a young woman who risks everything to help a god and thus frees herself from her poisonous family. 

 

Hugo Eligible Novels I Haven’t Gotten To Yet

No matter how many people I know don’t believe it, I really can’t read everything in a given year; especially when 10% of my reading goes to the #WotNReadingChallenge. Additionally, SFF isn’t all I read. Here are some books that you might want to check out that are on my list to check out.

Series Starters/Stand-alone

How Rory Thorne Destroyed the Multiverse by K. Eason

The Raven Tower by Ann Leckie

The Ruin of Kings by Jenn Lyons

A Song for a New Day by Sarah Pinsker

Chilling Effect by Valerie Valdes

Follow-ups

The Kingdom of Copper by S.A. Chakraborty

The Sinister Mystery of the Mesmerizing Girl by Theodora Goss

Jade War by Fonda Lee

The Dragon Republic by RF Kuang

A Choir of Lies by Alexandra Rowland

 

It always feels like there is an infinite amount of SFF books published every year; did we miss your favorite Hugo eligible novel? Discuss your favorite SFF of the year with us on social media!

 

 


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About the author

Siobhan Dempsey

Siobhan needs books to function, and therefore can infodump quite a lot about them, particularly when they're either science fiction or fantasy.

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