Reviews

Review – Gen:LOCK Episodes 1 and 2 (Rooster Teeth)

gen:LOCK (Rooster Teeth) featured image cropped
Overall
8.8/10
8.8/10
  • Writing - 9/10
    9/10
  • Development - 8.5/10
    8.5/10
  • Overall - 8.75/10
    8.8/10
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Summary

Writer: Gray G. Haddock
Director: Gray G. Haddock
Producer(s): Burnie Burns, Joe Clary, Nicole Fisher, Gary G. Haddock, Chrysta Hiser, Matt Hullum, Michael B. Jordan, Jason Kane, Alana Mayo, Sean Murphy, Jennifer K. Tidwell, Koen Wooten
Release Date: January 26th, 2019
Production: Rooster Teeth, Outlier Society Productions

Gen:LOCK is the newest series from Rooster Teeth. The series is set in 2068. Humanity is still on earth, but they’re still divided. One side is managing to hold the line, while the other seeks to control everyone and everything.

Rooster Teeth Blows Fans Away With Gen:LOCK

Gen:LOCK is the newest series from Rooster Teeth; the same people who brought us Red vs. Blue and RWBY. Gen:LOCK is a dystopian future, about fifty years from now. Naturally, in the future, the best way to handle any conflict is to bring giant mechas into the mix. On the bright side, that means that there’s going to be lots of fun fights for us to see.

The series was off to a great start before it even released its first trailer. One of their first announcements was to tell us the voice actors they had managed to cast. Once that news was out, many fans were sold. And I counted myself among them. Actors involved in this project include David Tennant, Michael B. Jordan, Dakota Fanning, Maisie Williams, Shari Belafonte, plus many voice actors we’ve heard in other Rooster Teeth Productions.

Writing

gen:LOCK (Rooster Teeth) poster
gen:LOCK (Rooster Teeth)

The first two episodes of gen:LOCK were released at the same time. This is likely due to the sheer amount of background this series had to cover. In a short amount of time, they had to introduce us to this advanced timeline, to the dangers humanity is facing, and to the characters involved. All while making it believable and interesting. Not an easy task.

Gray G. Haddock did a brilliant job introducing us to a cast of dynamic characters. The main character, Julian, received the most attention, but many of the secondary and supporting characters were fleshed out as well. These characters felt like real people—they had reasons to care about the situation at hand, they were complex and didn’t always act perfectly, the works. There was more than one occasion where I found myself misting up, or feeling indignant or a myriad of other emotions for the sake of a character. 

Likewise, the plot is intriguing. They did a great job of introducing the main threat to the series. There is little room left to the imagination for just how bad things could get if there was no resistance. My only regret is that the enemy as it stands has no face. They’re just a bunch of nameless and faceless people. We need somebody to focus our attention—somebody we can feel good about hating.

Development

Considering the amount of ground that had to be covered, it’s really no surprise that the first two episodes of the series were fast-paced. It felt like every few moments something else was happening. Even the calmer moments designed for character development felt like they had something larger going on.

The way they’ve pushed and pulled their characters in just the first two episodes alone is impressive. It’s impossible not to feel for these characters—some more than others, naturally. Their situations may not be ones that we can picture ourselves in, but that doesn’t mean we can’t sympathize. The combination of writing and acting talent really did force out some strong emotions, especially in the second episode.

The revelations made were well done and perfectly timed. Many of them had a strong emotional impact and likely would have even without the character development running alongside it. This is fortunate, since there are times where the more heavily action pieces don’t feel like they’re part of the same world with all the characters being developed.

It’s hard to find a good mecha series. From the minimal we’ve been shown so far, it sure seems like gen:LOCK might just be able to fit into that category. The mechas shown are sleek, elegant, and quickly proved that they’re still fully capable of stomping enemies into the ground. It was extremely satisfying to watch. I’m looking forward to seeing more of the mechas they haven’t yet introduced. 

Conclusion

Gen:LOCK didn’t waste any time throwing its viewers into the thick of things. They wanted to make a good impression, and they succeeded. They’ve fulfilled their promise of a science fiction world with mechas running around, as well as providing us with a world of fleshed out characters.


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About the author

Cat Wyatt

Cat Wyatt is an avid comic book reader, as well as a reader of novels. Her favorite genres are science fiction and fantasy, though she's usually willing to try other genres as well. Cat collects Funko Pop figures, Harry Potter books (different editions), and has more bookshelves than she's willing to admit.

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