Reviews

Review – Loki #2 (Marvel Comics)

Loki #2
Overall
8/10
8/10
  • Writing - 8/10
    8/10
  • Art - 8/10
    8/10
  • Overall - 8/10
    8/10
Sending
User Review
10/10 (1 vote)

Summary

Writer: Daniel Kibblesmith
Artist: Oscar Bazaldua
Colorist: David Curiel
Letterer: VC’s Clayton Cowles
Publisher: Marvel
Release Date: August 14th, 2019

Loki #2 shows us what the god of mischief is like when he’s set to questioning everything that makes him what it is. But sort of chaos will this adventure of his cost?

 

Loki #2 Brings Forth Tricks and Changes

Before we begin, this is another reminder that the events in Loki directly follow everything that happened in War of the Realms. So if you’re looking to avoid spoilers, you should probably wait on checking out this series (or even this review, if you really want to play it safe). Loki #2 brings together two fan favorites, as you can clearly tell from the cover of this issue. And while you just know things are going to play slightly differently than shown, it’s hard not to get a little curious about what is really happening here.

Loki finally has everything he wants, only to learn that it isn’t enough. And man, doesn’t that sound familiar? So Loki, being Loki, has decided to add onto the list of things he wants. And some of the additions may just surprise you.

Writing

Loki #2 (Marvel Comics) main cover by Ozgur Yildirim
Loki #2 (Marvel Comics) main cover by Ozgur Yildirim

Loki #2 managed to bounce back and forth between humorous and fascinating in the blink of an eye. To be fair, that’s sort of the balance we hope to see with Loki; but it’s perfectly done here. There are amusing moments galore—from the clever shirt he’s wearing to the banter. But then there are the scenes that really set the tone for what is happening—even while Loki is being quite cavalier about it all.

Daniel Kibblesmith has taken over writing for Loki’s newest adventure, though I’m sure he’s consulting with Jason Aaron so that Loki and Thor’s plots can lead back together once again. He’s doing an amazing job with the character so far, reflecting the sass and indignation that Loki is so well known for.

This issue was an interesting one, on the whole. It uses some different storytelling techniques, such as jumping between several points in time, in order to tell a cohesive tale. The end result is something fairly unpredictable; but that’s a good thing in this case.

Art

Loki #2 had some absolutely brilliant artwork inside, and all credit should go to Oscar Bazaldua and David Curiel for the scenes they’ve created. While the issue as a whole was appealing to look at, there were some scenes that stood out among the rest. In particular, the opening scene, the one which portrays Friday in her digital form, is excellently rendered. I don’t think I’ve seen a holograph look quite that fascinating in some time. Granted, the uh, alterations made later on certainly added some humor to the mix.

The expressions in this issue were comical—with exaggerated emotions taking over. It fit in well with the story being told. And of course, there’s nothing better than Loki when he’s hit a moment of pure exasperation.

Conclusion

Loki #2 was an interesting follow-up to the first issue in the series. It threw in more twists and complications to the tale—which proves that the story truly does revolve about this character of mischief. Oddly enough, it puts certain elements taken for granted into question—which is a refreshing change. On the whole, this issue will be perfect for readers hoping to learn a bit more about Loki. Or just seeing more of Loki doing what he does best—get himself into trouble.


To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook

Check out other comic book news, previews and reviews here!

Social Media logo PatreonFollow Word of the Nerd on

     

Bringing out YOUR inner nerd!

About the author

Cat Wyatt

Cat Wyatt is an avid comic book reader, as well as a reader of novels. Her favorite genres are science fiction and fantasy, though she's usually willing to try other genres as well. Cat collects Funko Pop figures, Harry Potter books (different editions), and has more bookshelves than she's willing to admit.

Advertisement

Check out our YouTube Channel

%d bloggers like this: