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Review – Robots Vs. Princesses (Dynamite Entertainment)

Robots Vs. Princesses (Dynamite Entertainment) cover (detail) by Nicolas Chapuis
Robots Vs. Princesses
Overall
9/10
9/10
  • Writing - 9/10
    9/10
  • Art - 9/10
    9/10
  • Overall - 9/10
    9/10
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Summary

Writer: Todd Matthy
Penciler: Nicolas Chapuis
Colorist: Nicolas Chapuis
Letterer: Sean Rhinehart
Cover Art: Nicolas Chapuis
Publisher: Dynamite Entertainment
Maturity Rating: Teen
Release Date: October 2nd, 2019

This is the collection of the series Robots Vs. Princesses. A lone robot seeks freedom from an oppressive war and finds a friend in a headstrong princess. The evil robots discover what is going on and wage war on the peaceful kingdom. 

It’s a Genre Mashup In Robots Vs. Princesses

Recent years have seen the rise of genre mashups in popular culture. There have been some strange entries like Archie vs. Predator or Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Robots Vs. Princesses does something of the same, giving us something like Disney Princesses vs. Transformers. Whoever dreamed up the concept must have been thinking way outside of the box, as it is a pairing that not many people would have thought of. On the other hand, part of what makes comics great is that ideas like this can get made in this medium. In terms of scale, it is easier to justify a comic series to such a concept. In terms of presentation, comics are second only to CGI for letting the imaginations of the artists run wild. Does it work, though?

Writing

Robots Vs. Princesses Vol. 1 (Dynamite Entertainment) cover by Nicolas Chapuis
Robots Vs. Princesses Vol. 1 (Dynamite Entertainment) cover by Nicolas Chapuis

Todd Matthy has the writing duties here, and succeeds at keeping Robots Vs. Princesses appropriately relevant to its source material. The princesses are whimsical when they need to be. They habitually break out in song to defeat their enemies. The robots are not so whimsical, and instead, are a lot more menacing. Because of the princesses, this is a fantasy setting, and so the robots are a bit more out of place. With that being considered though, it doesn’t drag the story down, as the tone is kept mostly light all the way through. 

The writing especially comes to life with how invested the writer is with making the princesses’ song sound genuine.  This shows a lot of desire to capture the necessary detail of the genre as it could have otherwise have been ignored. 

Art

Nicolas Chapuis keeps the series’ tone light with his vibrant pencils. The princesses look like they could have been plucked out of a Disney story. The robots, while not actually Transformers, have the same look and feel of their more famous counterparts. This is a case where the artist meets the expectations of the story almost perfectly. The action scenes also are well-paced and jump off of the page. 

Conclusion

Those dissuaded by the strange genre mashup in Robots Vs. Princesses should put their hesitations aside and try to remember what it was like to be a young child discovering comics for the first time. This series is less about character motivations and multiverses and more about fun. One caveat is that the series probably reads better as a collection than as a series. The story flows well, so much so that it almost seems like it was built as a whole story, and then made into issues afterwards. In the end, the strange mashup works surprisingly well. This is thanks to the creative team taking the inspirations and running with it to create a small gem of a series. 


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Edward Wendt

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