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Review – The Last God #1 (DC Comics)

The Last God #1
Overall
9.5/10
9.5/10
  • Writing - 9.5/10
    9.5/10
  • Art - 9.5/10
    9.5/10
  • Overall - 9.5/10
    9.5/10
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The Last God #1

Writer: Phillip Kennedy Johnson
Penciler: Riccardo Federici
Colorist: Sunny Gho with Dean White
Letterer: Tom Napolitano
Cover Art: Kai Carpenter
Publisher: DC Comics
Maturity Rating: Teen
Release Date: October 30th, 2019

A new fantasy is born as an evil threatens the lands.  A group of heroes comes together to fight the evil, but then faces a new threat thirty years later as the evil returns. 

Heroes Return and Heroes Emerge in the Last God #1

Fantasy stories are somewhat of an oddity in the medium of comics.  Although the genre is very similar in many respects to those more popular in comics, it often finds itself struggling to find stories which can be told.  In truth, the genre might be better served by that of regular books.  It requires a decent amount of worldbuilding and exposition, neither of which play off well in comics.  The Last God #1 tells a story based in a fantasy realm of two groups of heroes separated in time by thirty years. 

Writing

The Last God #1 (DC Comics) Cover Art: Kai Carpenter
The Last God #1 (DC Comics) Cover Art: Kai Carpenter

That the Last God #1 doesn’t take a lot of time to get the story going shows that the writer, Phillip Kennedy Johnson, has an awareness of the challenges of the medium.  Very little time is spent in worldbuilding and exposition.  In fact, the story jumps into action right away and uses exposition as it progresses as necessary.  This works to the benefit of the story as the exposition seems natural and relevant but also compact.  This action packed first issue progresses well, and builds the story going into the second issue. 

What follows the story is interesting though and shows the writer is using his resources as best as possible.  The back pages of a book often contain concept art, or in older days they contained the letter column.  Here though, the writer has written articles which pertain to the fantasy world that he has created.  One of these even details one of the songs sung in the first issue.  This is an interesting workaround of the challenges of fantasy in this medium.  The writer therefore deserves top credit for his approach and use of the medium, as well as the slick story. 

Art

Riccardo Federici has the art duties here, with the color being led by Sunny Gho, and assisted by Dean White.  Fantasy tends to have a variety of different generic looks, as is evident here.  The muted grey tones are similar to Game of Thrones.  This is an apt connection as the story itself feels somewhat like the book series, and so the art here makes a connection with the readers.  It is clear that this is not a happy world full of fairies and unicorns, but rather that dark forces are at play. 

Conclusion

This is a good introduction to this new series and this new world.  The creative team behind The Last God #1 really seems to know how to work what they are given.  First of all, the art and the story work well and immediately set the tone for the series.  Secondly the creative team really seems to understand to work with the constraints of the medium, using what space they have most effectively.  Even people who are not fans of the genre would probably enjoy reading this issue just for the inventive use of space by the creative team.  People who are fans of the genre might find a lot more to grab onto here, and might even find the beginning of a favorite story. 

 

 


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Edward Wendt

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