Reviews

Review: Uncanny #3

Uncanny Cover 3There’s a line towards the end of this issue of Uncanny that, I think, sums up the main character perfectly: “You’ve been running away your whole life, Weaver…Maybe you finally found something to run towards.” Actually, that line could sum up many a reluctant hero, but it’s most prescient when spoken by Maggie Ford to Weaver after he’s been offered a deal that might provide the answers both characters have been looking for, “Why are they Active?” In the world of Uncanny, Actives are those like Weaver and Maggie who have their own special sets of abilities, though this is the first time Weaver’s ever encountered someone like him so to speak. Like Mutants in the Marvel Universe or Metas in the DC Universe, Actives are the product of fluke genetics, and it seems that a group known as Cadre may have found a way to weaponize this genetic randomness.   After being rescued by Maggie from his recent troubles in Singapore, Weaver is introduced to her employer, Deacon Styles, who wants Weaver and Maggie to steal a briefcase from Cadre’s Chief Scientist that contains information about their breakthrough. For their troubles, they’ll each receive half a million dollars and the freedom to walk away. It’s that simple.

Or is it? Remember, this is a book written by Andy Diggle, so it’s never that simple. And I mean that in the most complimentary ways possible.

Weaver and MaggieWeaver is the quintessential anti-hero caught between a rock and a hard place. Styles has already maneuvered him into the middle of a James Bond fantasy where he has to navigate between two secret organizations hungry for power. Oddly, though, Styles’ selling point for getting Weaver on board is to present him with incentives both financial and personal. Going back to the quote at the top, Maggie’s words are especially significant when we do learn everything about Weaver, and I mean everything. Styles knows exactly who he is, but that knowledge only goes skin deep. He knows Weaver’s real name and his family history, but the big question, the one that plagues Weaver and other Actives, is still unknown. This “mission”, for lack of a better term, could bring Weaver and Maggie a step closer to understanding why they have these abilities. It’s an interesting idea about what truly motivates us. Weaver could easily say he’s doing it for the money, but we know there’s a part of him who wants answers as well. By issue’s end, however, we learn there may be more to Weaver’s acceptance of the mission than even he realizes.

Aaron Campbell’s art continues to be spectacular. His photo-realistic style makes the book more in tune with a spy movie, which is enhanced beautifully by Bill Crabtree’s colors. Weaver and Styles’ conversation in the, for all intents and purposes, War Room washes the characters in shades of blue that allow the big screen display to act as the room’s light source, putting Weaver’s emotional state front and center as he’s bombarded with information about himself and his “assignment.” I’m always a sucker for a stunning set of eyes and Campbell gives Weaver one hell of an expressive face when he needs to make an impact.

Final Thoughts: Intrigue, espionage, and superhuman abilities? Yeah, you should keep reading this. Besides, that wolf looks awfully shady.

About the author

Samantha Cross

Sam is a self-described "sponge for information" soaking up little tidbits here and there that make her the perfect partner on pub trivia night! Hailing from the beautiful Pacific Northwest, she indulges her nerdy and geeky qualities by hanging out at the local comic book shop, reading anything she can find, and voicing her opinion whether you welcome it or not. An archivist and historian, she will research any and all things and will throw down if you want to quote Monty Python, Mel Brooks, or The Simpsons!

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