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Review – White Fox #1 (Marvel Comics)

White Fox #1 (Marvel Comics) Avengers variant cover (detail) by Sana Takeda
White Fox #1
Overall
8/10
8/10
  • Writing - 8/10
    8/10
  • Art - 8/10
    8/10
  • Overall - 8/10
    8/10
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Summary

Writer: Alyssa Wong
Pencilers: Kevin Libranda, Geoffo, Ale Garza
Colorists: Israel Silva, Dono Sanchez-Almara
Letterer: Joe Sabino
Cover Art: In-Hyuk Lee
Publisher: Marvel
Maturity Rating: Teen
Release Date: October 9, 2019

Introducing the White Fox to the Marvel Universe. Her background is told as she discovers her powers as a teenager while rescuing her friend. This issue helps to introduce the character as one of the new Agents of Atlas. Also a back-up story for the Future Avengers.

Get Bright-Eyed in White Fox #1

The introduction of new heroes is a staple of the comic book industry. More of them end up in publishing limbo than headlining their own movies. However, occasionally new heroes make it through who speak to the public zeitgeist. White Fox. and indeed the entire banner of Future Fight Firsts, seems interested in this, as they are trying to introduce new characters to the Marvel Universe, ostensibly as members of the new superhero team, Agents of Atlas. Does it work, though? Could White Fox manage to make it in the big world of superhero titles? Let’s find out, starting with White Fox #1!

Writing

White Fox #1 (Marvel Comics) main cover by In-Hyuk Lee
White Fox #1 (Marvel Comics) main cover by In-Hyuk Lee

There is not one story here, but two. The first story, not surprisingly, deals with the White Fox, detailing key aspects of her origin. The other is a story about the Future Avengers learning a lesson in teamwork. Both have Alyssa Wong as their writer. For those used to reading main stories with backup stories, the outcome should not be a surprise here. The main story is much better, with more fleshed-out characters than the backup story. There is even a decent amount of detail in the concerns of being a superhero. The backup story is not as good. It benefits from being a shorter read, but the scenario is a bit convoluted.

Art

The art duties are split between two teams here. Kevin Libranda and Geoffo have the pencils for the first story with color by Israel Silva. Ale Garza does the pencils for the second story with color by Dono Sanchez-Almara. As with the writing, the first story is better than the second. Particular detail seems to have been paid to making the main hero have a compelling look in her human form, half-transformed form, and fully-transformed form. As a whole, the art works and fits the story’s quality. This is just not as good in the second story, as the art seems to meet the same convoluted ending. 

The compelling cover was done by In-Hyuk Lee. 

Conclusion

It is hard to introduce new characters to an established comic book universe with the hopes of making them stick. It does seem, at times, like the creative team is throwing all the tricks they can at this one. The characters are shown to be young (and orphaned) with powers that they can’t share with the world. Although that makes the approach a bit formulaic, it mostly works here. The cover would seem to indicate a certain kind of hero, as a South Korean version of Black Widow came to mind. However, the interior of the book shows a different side, more relatable with a decent backstory. 

It can be hard to introduce a new character, but it seems at the very least like the basics are here. White Fox might not be headlining the next Marvel movie, but there is enough foundation here to maybe build something bigger on. 


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Edward Wendt

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